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Challenging a Federal Court Decision Shutting the Courthouse Door on Consumers, Because Privacy Invasion Supposedly Wasn’t an “Injury”

In a case called Romero v. Department Stores National Bank, for example, a consumer received literally hundreds of robocalls from the banks that issue Macy’s-branded credit cards, despite the fact that she repeatedly told them to stop calling her. The consumer sued the banks for violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act—a statute that prohibits unwanted robocalls to cell phones. But the trial court held that the consumer lacked standing to bring her lawsuit.

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Seeks to Limit Court Secrecy

The federal government says that court secrecy is preventing it from protecting consumers. To stop that, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued guidance that urges all judges, plaintiffs, defendants, and lawyers, as well as parties wishing to submit amicus briefs, to ensure that every protective and secrecy order and agreement “specifically allows for disclosure” to the “CPSC and other government public health and safety agencies.”

  • Donald Trump: Not COOL

    After running and winning in large part based on his pledge to “be an aggressive proponent for defending the economic interests of American workers and farmers on the world stage,” Donald Trump has taken one of his first concrete steps on agriculture policy. It is an early gift to multinational corporations at the expense of United States farmers.

Unsealed Remington Documents Posted by Public Justice Show Defective Triggers in Millions of Rifles Could Fire on Their Own

Public Justice has made over 133,000 previously-sealed Remington documents available to the public on a new website, www.remingtondocuments.com. The documents show the company knew for decades the trigger in the Remington Model 700—the most popular bolt-action rifle in America—and a dozen other Remington models could fire when no one pulled it.