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Public Justice

  • Justice Works

    A recent study from Intuit predicted that 40% of Americans will be classified as “independent contractors,” or other freelance occupations, by 2020. As a result, from Uber drivers to the truck drivers that move our economy forward, more and more workers will have fewer and…

Justice For My Dad

In 2009, my father, Rafael Solis, Sr., died at the hands and feet of jailers in Webb County, Texas who were entrusted with his care. For the past 8 years, my family has waited for justice, and for those on whose watch my father died to be held accountable.

Will Congress Give Abusive Nursing Homes a ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ Card?

A group of lawmakers wants to hand the nursing home industry a get-out-of-jail free card, in the form of HR 1215. The bill, which is deceptively titled the “Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017,” would cap the amount of “non-economic” damages a victim could obtain from a nursing home in a lawsuit at just $250,000 per case, no matter how many victims were hurt or how many people (or corporations) are responsible.

Leading the Fight Against “Ag Gag” Laws

In recent years, more and more state legislatures have – at the urging of lobbyists representing factory farm operations and industrial food producers – taken up “Ag Gag” laws that essentially shroud the operations of these mega-farms in secrecy and make holding them accountable difficult, if not impossible. At Public Justice, we believe everyone has the right to know where their food came from, how it was produced and the health and environmental ramifications of the factory farm industry’s operations. That’s why our Food Project has led the way in challenging these laws in court.

Taking on Congress to Preserve Class Actions

The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed H.R. 985, the so-called “Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act.” This sweeping legislation would make it virtually impossible to bring a class action lawsuit, effectively locking the courthouse doors to millions of Americans. The final vote in the House represented a very narrow victory (220 – 201), setting the stage for a real battle in the United States Senate.